Barack Obama's citizenship

It's 97% certain that Barack Obama was born in Hawaii. There's a 5% chance he was born at the Kapi'olani Maternity Home, a 5% chance he was born at the Queens Hospital, and a 84% chance he was born at home. No Honolulu hospital has a record of Obama or mother ever being there. There's also a 5% chance that Obama was born in Vancouver, BC and a 1% chance he was born in Kenya. Wherever he was born, he had one American citizen parent and one Kenyan citizen parent. An Indonesian adoption, while Stanley Ann was married to Lolo Soetoro could further complicate Obama's status.

At birth, Barack Obama gets his citizenship via the 14th Amendment (assuming Hawaii):

        "All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside."

Obama also has his citizenship defined via the Immigration and Nationality Act -- "by statute."

Sec. 305. [8 U.S.C. 1405] Persons born in Hawaii:

        A person born in Hawaii on or after August 12, 1898, and before April 30, 1900, is declared to be a citizen of the United States as of April 30, 1900. A person born in Hawaii on or after April 30, 1900, is a citizen of the United States at birth. A person who was a citizen of the Republic of Hawaii on August 12, 1898, is declared to be a citizen of the United States as of April 30, 1900.

At birth, Barack Obama was also a Kenyan citizen and a subject of Great Britain:

        "When Barack Obama Jr. was born on Aug. 4,1961, in Honolulu, Kenya was a British colony, still part of the United Kingdom’s dwindling empire. As a Kenyan native, Barack Obama Sr. was a British subject whose citizenship status was governed by The British Nationality Act of 1948. That same act governed the status of Obama Sr.‘s children.

The implications of a Soetoro adoption:

        Under Indonesian law, when a male acknowledges a child as his son, it deems the son, in this case Soetoro/Obama, an Indonesian State citizen. See Constitution of Republic of Indonesia, Law No. 62 of 1958 concerning Immigration Affairs and Indonesian Civil Code (Kitab Undang-undang Hukum Perdata) (KUHPer) (Burgerlijk Wetboek voor Indonesie).

The implications of Kenyan or British Columbian birth:

        Sec. 301. [8 U.S.C. 1405] Nationals and Citizens of the United States at Birth:

        (d) a person born outside of the United States and its outlying possessions of parents one of whom is a citizen of the United States who has been physically present in the United States or one of its outlying possessions for a continuous period of one year prior to the birth of such person, and the other of whom is a national, but not a citizen of the United States;

        (e) a person born in an outlying possession of the United States of parents one of whom is a citizen of the United States who has been physically present in the United States or one of its outlying possessions for a continuous period of one year at any time prior to the birth of such person;

This case meets the test of jus soli -- born in the USA (97%)

This case fails the test of jus sanguinis -- one or both parents are NOT US citizens

"At birth," this person was subject to the laws and jurisdiction of the United States, Great Britain and Kenya. This person has "dual citizenship" via his father. He is NOT a "natural born" citizen, and is NOT eligible to serve as Commander-in-Chief.